Posted on Jan 20, 2014 | 2 comments

Dawn two days after a snowfall

Dawn two days after a snowfall

Every year I find magic right in my garden after a snowfall.

Saturday’s snow was just the right consistency for creating “snow flowers” that last awhile. A little wet so it lingers and when you shovel, you have to pause.

Rose "snow flowers"

Rose “snow flowers”

What are “snow flowers” you ask? I learned about this concept in a novel I read years ago. The title and author long forgotten, but the idea that in ancient Japan villagers held an annual “Snow Flower Festival”  nestled in my memory like a precious jewel.

Spruce "snow flowers"

Spruce “snow flowers”

The crevices in both deciduous and coniferous plants capture snow to create “snow flowers”. The villagers, as I remember the story, create gardens that celebrate them. It may be because it’s some mountainous place where snow reigns and the villagers need the entertainment.

Every year as  I shovel, I pause (read catch my breath!) to admire the crevice filled branches and nooks.

Lilac "snow flowers"

Lilac “snow flowers”

This year I decided I’d hold my own Winter Snow Festival. I’ve included a few of the contenders for you to consider.

Dogwood & Fir Tree "snow flowers"

Dogwood & Fir Tree “snow flowers”

Which is the most beautiful? Let me know which you like best so I can award the plant the “Best of 2014 Winter Festival”.

I do have to admit that the photos can’t include the physical sensual information.  When I’m looking at them, I’m feeling the sun or snow or cold on my face, the body rush after the exercise of shoveling, the fresh air in my lungs after being housebound for the storm, and usually the sounds of birds. But perhaps you can use your imagination to add to the visuals. Or better yet, if you live with snowstorms, wander around your gardens and see what contenders you have. Happy looking.

Winter Arrangement "snow flowers"

Winter Arrangement “snow flowers”