Maria von Brincken Landscape Garden Design

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Spring Delights at the Flower Show and in my Garden

Spring Delights at the Flower Show and in my Garden

Posted on Mar 21, 2012 | 0 comments

Wandering the Boston Flower and Garden Show last Saturday, random people asked me repeated about one particular plant.  Maybe it’s because I was wearing my Speaker’s Badge and looked official.  Which plant you ask?  the Hellebore.  Seems to be the year of the Hellebore for me. At least at the show and in my front and back gardens. It’s...

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Arnold keeps its Promise

Arnold keeps its Promise

Posted on Feb 22, 2012 | 0 comments

Away over President’s Day holiday weekend, I returned to find the Witch Hazel ‘Arnold’s Promise’ in full bloom! This wonderful Hamamelis leads the way to springs’ bounty. Depending on the winter it blooms from anywhere from late January or early February to April. In last year’s record- setting cold and deep snow cover...

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Ochids & Witch Hazel-Two different Winter Flowering Plants

Ochids & Witch Hazel-Two different Winter Flowering Plants

Posted on Mar 12, 2011 | 0 comments

    An unlikely combination, but the welcoming cheer of early blooming Witch Hazel ‘Arnold’s Promise’ greets me outside, while the white orchids inside provide a note of grace. Note that the green leaves of the broad-leaf evergreen Rhododendron provides contrast so I can “see” the wonderful yellow flowers of the Hamamelis. In...

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It’s Witch Hazel, Forsythia blooms later

It’s Witch Hazel, Forsythia blooms later

Posted on Mar 13, 2010 | 0 comments

Early March forty five minutes west of Boston, witch hazel brightens the late winter landscape. This year it’s adding its cheer in early March–other years it appears in February.Wherever possible I use this native in planting combinations as the first blooming shrub. The small newly planted rhodies in the background will grow to create...

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Revisiting ‘Snow Flowers’

Revisiting ‘Snow Flowers’

Posted on Jan 31, 2010 | 1 comment

Sometime ago I encountered an enchanting description of a small Japanese village’s winter festival that celebrated the way plants catch snow.  The novel’s author called the snow that was captured in nooks and crannies, branches and seedheads, branches and buds, ‘Snow Flowers’.  Ever since I look at fresh snow...

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