Posted on May 31, 2009 | 0 comments

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Iris sibirica,

Looking down from Deck --blue -purple Iris sibirica and yellow pseudacorus (MA prohibited list--do not plant), blue Polemonium (Jacob's Ladder), and Hosta and a bit of pink Aquilegia amid the Daphne caucasia

Iris in the front side garden
Purple Iris germanica with pink Dianthus, pink Rhododendren, blue Nepata, chartreuse Alchemilla in the front side garden
Clematis Adds to Deck View
Clematis montana ‘Grandiflora’ Adds to Deck View
Clematis m. Grandiflora below Deck

Clematis m. 'Grandiflora' below deck and pink Aquilegia (Columbine) and Hosta

Today’s  images were taken from the north west and north east garden areas.  I couldn’t get them in the order I wanted so imagine being enchanted by the flowering clematis montana ‘grandiflora’ as seen from the sun room.  Enticed outside, I looked over the deck to the gardens below.  The yellow and blue iris  are the show-offs in that area today. Researching the Latin name for the yellow flag I discovered that “other names for yellow flag are yellow iris, yellow flag iris, segg and Jacob’s sword. The word segg comes from the Anglo-Saxon word sedgewhich is a short sword. The leaves of this plant looks like swords, hence the name. Yellow flag is thought to be the plant on which the heraldic “fleur-de-lis” was based. This wildflower grows throughout the Western Isles by streams, rivers, in wet meadow areas and near houses. Yellow flag flowers early in the year in May, and is a very useful food source to the early emerging bees”  This information from www.thewesternisles.co.uk/…/yellow-flag.htm. Imagine that! Note: Do Not plant in wetland area as iris psuedacorus is a prohibited invasive plant. Use the non-invasive white sibirian or a yellow german iris. I plan to remove this plant and replace with yellow german iris.

In the front gardens, several varieties of Iris germanica are stealing the show as well. A purple version harmonizes well with the chartreuse Alchemilla mollis or Lady’s mantle shown in the close-up.  The overall photo illustrates how it plays with the others.

Iris germanica (Bearded Iris) with Alchemilla (Ladies Mantle)

Iris germanica (Bearded Iris) with Alchemilla mollis (Ladies Mantle)