Posted on Oct 12, 2013 | 0 comments

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My favorite today--'Knock-out' pink roses paired with burgundy viburnum 'Mariesii' foliage

My favorite today–‘Knock-out’ pink roses paired with burgundy viburnum ‘Mariesii’ foliage

Laceleaf J. Maple with yellowed fern, blue hosta, Pin oak scarlet and green leaves

Laceleaf J. Maple with yellowed fern, blue hosta, Pin oak scarlet and green leaves

Scarlet enkianthus with epimedium and hosta with a couple of yellow leaves

Scarlet enkianthus with epimedium and hosta with a couple of yellow leaves

Acer folicifolia or Laceleaf Japanese Maple with PJM rhododendren

Acer folicifolium or Laceleaf Japanese Maple with PJM rhododendren

I’m loving our New England Autumn.  The leaves have been turning one by one– here and there– for weeks.

Now it’s clumps of yellow, orange, and scarlet, and green gearing up to an amazing crescendo sometime soon.

Here’s a few photos taken from my back garden. The garden’s fall  foliage design shows off. Enjoy.

And while you’re enjoying the textures and colors of this fall garden tapestry, you might mull over what I am thinking about.

I heard Tom Mickey talking about his recently published book America’s Romance with the English Garden the other night.

I was struck by the intersection of technology–linotype printing and chromos–and seed men selling their wares. (And, the US Post.)

Mass produced beautifully illustrated seed catalogues were mailed to every home.

Covers and inside illustrations, as well as, articles seduced Americans from sea to shining sea with images.  Images that depicted the English Garden of the times–late 1890 and early 1900’s. Lawn to the house, peripheral trees, winding walk or drive, flower bed.

And the message was clear.  This was the ONLY way to create a pleasant home.